Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Belladonna-Atropa acuminata seeds for sale

Medicinal use of Indian Belladonna : Belladonna-Atropa acuminata a native of  Gilgat (Azad Kashmir). It grows wild/ground  in the Kashmir to Gilgat. It is cultivated in Pakistan, IRAN,, Italy, India, USA, Europe, it is sparingly cultivated in Gilgat, Muzaffarabad. (Azd Kashmir. A. BELLADONA introduced in Kashmir and Gilgat by Europeans which has crossed with Himalayan

Cashmiriana belladonna has very similar uses to the related deadly nightshade (A. bella-donna). The roots and leaves are used in India as anodyne, diuretic, mydriatic, narcotic and sedative. The following uses for deadly nightshade are also probably applicable for this species:- Although it is poisonous, deadly nightshade has a long history of medicinal use and has a wide range of applications, in particular it is used to dilate the pupils in eye operations, to relieve intestinal colic and to treat peptic ulcers. The plant can be used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, reducing tremors and rigidity whilst improving speech and mobility. It has also been used as an antidote in cases of mushroom or toadstool poisoning. This is a very poisonous plant, it should be used with extreme caution and only under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. See also the notes above on toxicity. All parts of the plant are analgesic, antidote, antispasmodic, diuretic, hallucinogenic, mydriatic, narcotic and sedative. The root is the most active part of the plant, it is harvested in the autumn and can be 1 - 3 years old, though the older roots are very large and difficult to dig up. The leaves are harvested in late spring and dried for later use. All parts of the plant contain tropane alkaloids. The leaves contain on average 0.4% active alkaloids, whilst the root contains around 0.6%. The alkaloid content also varies according to the development of the plant, being low when the plant is flowering and very high when bearing green berries. These alkaloids inhibit the parasympathetic nervous system which controls involuntary body activities. This reduces saliva, gastric, intestinal and bronchial secretions, as well as the activity of the urinary tubules, bladder and intestines. An extract of the plant has been used as eyedrops. It has the effect of dilating the pupils thus making it easier to perform eye operations. In the past women used to put the drops in their eyes in order to make them look larger and thus "more beautiful". The entire plant, harvested when coming into flower, is used to make a homeopathic remedy. This is used especially in cases where there is localised and painful inflammation that radiates heat. It is also used to treat sunstroke and painful menstruation.

Description of the plant :
Plant : Perennial
Height : 90 cm (2 feet)

Flovering : June to August
Habitat of the herb : Found at elevations between 1800 and 3600 metres.

Propagation of Belladonna : Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Germination of stored seed is slow and erratic, usually taking 1 - 6 months at 10 C. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of softwood terminal shoots in spring. Root cuttings in winter.

Cultivation of the herb : Found at elevations between 1800 and 3600 metres.

Known hazards of Atropa acuminata : The whole plant, and especially the root, is very poisonous. Even handling the plant has been known to cause problems if the person has cuts or grazes on the hand. The plant is particularly dangerous for children since the fruit looks attractive and has a sweet taste. The toxins are concentrated in the ripe fruit.

Belladona-Atropa acuminata Royle seeds are available at:
Chenab Industries Kashmir-CIK
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001

Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: cikashmir@gmail.com
home: http://chenabindustries.blogspot.com

Friday, November 12, 2010

saw palmetto in india, where can i get saw palmetto plant in india

Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens as mentioned, is a topical palm like small plant in North America. will extract from fruit or berries of the saw palmetto is derived, and the berries, while itself strongly with fatty acids (lauric acid, lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid enriched) polysaccharides) and phytosterols (plant sterols. It is extracted largely as an aphrodisiac for men and Women sold. aphrodisiac is an agent that is used in the belief that it increases sexual desire. Uses of Saw Palmetto Saw Palmetto has also been used to a wide range of conditions, including the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) to treated, a condition characterized by enlarged prostate, urinary tract other problems, skin diseases, thyroid defeciences, genitals, impotence, improve hormonal disorders, cystitis, etc.


Qty: 50, 100, 200, 500 seeds/ pkt
Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) seeds are available at:
Chenab Industries
Ist Street, Shaheed-e-Azeemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Mailing address: PO Box 667 Srinagar SGR J&K- 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Call us: 09858986794
e.mail: iirc@rediffmail.com

web: http://chenabindustries.blogspot.com

Thursday, November 11, 2010

CLARY SAGE-Salvia sclarea seeds for sale

Sage
Latin name: Salvia officinalis
Family: Labiatae
Medicinal use of Sage : Sage has a very long history of effective medicinal use and is an important domestic herbal remedy for disorders of the digestive system. Its antiseptic qualities make it an effective gargle for the mouth where it can heal sore throats, ulcers etc. The leaves applied to an aching tooth will often relieve the pain. The whole herb is antihydrotic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cholagogue, galactofuge, stimulant, tonic and vasodilator. Sage is also used internally in the treatment of excessive lactation, night sweats, excessive salivation (as in Parkinson's disease), profuse perspiration (as in TB), anxiety, depression, female sterility and menopausal problems. Many herbalists believe that the purple-leafed forms of this species are more potent medicinally. This remedy should not be prescribed to pregnant women or to people who have epileptic fits. The plant is toxic in excess or when taken for extended periods - though the toxic dose is very large. Externally, it is used to treat insect bites, skin, throat, mouth and gum infections and vaginal discharge. The leaves are best harvested before the plant comes into flower and are dried for later use. The essential oil from the plant is used in small doses to remove heavy collections of mucous from the respiratory organs and mixed in embrocations for treating rheumatism. In larger doses, however, it can cause epileptic fits, giddiness etc. The essential oil is used in aromatherapy. Its keyword is "Tonic".

Description of the plant:
Plant : Evergreen Shrub
Height : 60 cm (2 feet)
Flovering : June to August
Scent : Scented Shrub
Habitat of the herb : Dry banks and stony places, usually in limestone areas and often where there is very little soil.

Edible parts of Sage : Leaves and flowers - raw or cooked. A very common herb, the strongly aromatic leaves are used as a flavouring in cooked foods. They are an aid to digestion and so are often used with heavy, oily foods. They impart a sausage-like flavour to savoury dishes. The young leaves and flowers can be eaten raw, boiled, pickled or used in sandwiches. The flowers can also be sprinkled on salads to add colour and fragrance. A herb tea is made from the fresh or dried leaves, it is said to improve the digestion. An essential oil obtained from the plant is used commercially to flavour ice cream, sweets, baked goods etc.

Other uses of the herb : The leaves make excellent tooth cleaners, simply rub the top side of the leaf over the teeth and gums. The purple-leafed form of sage has tougher leaves and is better for cleaning the teeth. The leaves have antiseptic properties and can heal diseased gums. An essential oil from the leaves is used in perfumery, hair shampoos (it is good for dark hair) and as a food flavouring. It is a very effective "fixer" in perfumes, and is also used to flavour toothpastes and is added to bio-activating cosmetics. The plant (the flowers?) is an alternative ingredient of "QR" herbal compost activator. This is a dried and powdered mixture of several herbs that can be added to a compost heap in order to speed up bacterial activity and thus shorten the time needed to make the compost. The growing or dried plant is said to repel insects, it is especially useful when grown amongst cabbages and carrots. It was formerly used as a strewing herb and has been burnt in rooms to fumigate them. A good dense ground cover plant for sunny positions, though it needs weeding for the first year or two. They are best spaced about 60cm apart each way.

Propagation of Sage : Seed - sow March/April in a greenhouse. Germination usually takes place within 2 weeks. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in early summer. In areas where the plant is towards the limits of its hardiness, it is best to grow the plants on in a greenhouse for their first winter and plant them out in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of heeled shoots, taken off the stem in May and planted out directly into the garden grow away well. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 - 10cm with a heel, June to August in a frame. Easy. Cuttings of mature wood, 7 - 10cm with a heel, November/December in a cold frame. Layering in spring or autumn. Mound soil up into the plants, the branches will root into this soil and they can be removed and planted out 6 - 12 months later.

Cultivation of the herb : Dry banks and stony places, usually in limestone areas and often where there is very little soil.

Known hazards of Salvia officinalis : None known

Plant information taken from the Plants For A Future/Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre

Sage leaves powder
Price: 550/-50 grams/pkt
(Other pkts: 100, 200, 500 grams
Sage Oil: 1 Ltr. 9500/-
Available at:
Chenab Industries Kashmir-CIK
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
e-mail: cikashmir@gmail.com
home: http://chenabindustries.blogspot.com
 

Tuesday, November 2, 2010

Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens)

What is Saw Palmetto? Saw Palmetto Serenoa repens as mentioned, is a topical palm like small plant in North America. will extract from fruit or berries of the saw palmetto is derived, and the berries, while itself strongly with fatty acids (lauric acid, lauric acid, oleic acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid enriched) polysaccharides) and phytosterols (plant sterols. It is extracted largely as an aphrodisiac for men and Women sold. aphrodisiac is an agent that is used in the belief that it increases sexual desire. Uses of Saw Palmetto Saw Palmetto has also been used to a wide range of conditions, including the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) to treated, a condition characterized by enlarged prostate, urinary tract other problems, skin diseases, thyroid defeciences, genitals, impotence, improve hormonal disorders, cystitis, etc.

Among other advantages, also taken to the skin can be revitalize, urine flow in the breast enlargement men, women and pulmonary congestion due to cough, asthma and bronchitis. Role of saw palmetto in preventing hair loss recently, it was widely accepted as a very effective treatment, herbal hair loss reverse and treatment of diseases such as alopecia. It is one of the best hair loss treatment available today Organina considered. scientific evidence that Saw Palmetto inhibits the conversion of organic substances testosterone into DHT and prevents DHT from the addition bind to the androgen receptor thus a better control of hair loss in men. For the role of DHT in Palmetto hair loss because of its improved to prevent substantial understanding of the causes. It helps and hair follicles revitalize hair strength, volume and shine, scalp, making it less susceptible to stress and anger. So, if you for safe products for hair loss saw palmetto seeks an option you should consider first . Even if it does not help hair sudden outpouring known, but when taken over a period of time, would surely prevent it, hair loss and extend atleast situation where many people can go to the surgical option, as the transplant to restore her crown better. Taking it out on some vitamins and minerals. Are there any side effects associated with use of Saw Palmetto? There are no known side effects and documented with the use of Saw Palmetto associated both externally and internally However, if you have any concerns have on its always best to consult your doctor. How saw palmetto used for? internal lies:

The recommended dosage for saw palmetto between 160 mg / day to 320 mg / day, when taken orally. Ext: Saw palmetto can be used as an oil extract or ointment that can be gently massaged into the purchase are hair roots. Since its lipophilic components in nature, they are in the oil extracted base and are easily absorbed through the skin, making an even more productive. to leave If wash before hair, applied at least half an hour (1-2 hours to absorb better). For better heat absorption in hot water or in the microwave (50-10 seconds) before use. Preferably, it should be applied at night before bedtime and left overnight, the better results through better absorption.

Cultivation details:
Choose a location that has dry, well draining soil. The soil must be high in quartz and fine grained. The Saw Palmetto grows best in high heat yet also survives in short frosts. The tree grows well in shade or sun.

Plan on planting the seeds after the summer rains. Saturated soils can retard early growth and flooding can prevent root establishment.

Soak the seeds in warm water for at least 24 hours. Soaking enhances the germination process and helps the seeds sprout quicker.

Plant the seeds in the ground just below the surface. Often times the seeds pass through animal digestive systems and take root when the palm is out in the wilderness exposed to wildlife.

Water the newly planted seeds regularly, but not too much as they are a very drought tolerant plant. It grows well in dry ground. Shoots emerge from the seeds 30 to 60 days after planting, but optimal germination is observed up to 6 months.

Qty: 50,100,200,500 seeds/ pkt
Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) seeds are available at:
Chenab Industries
Ist Street, Shaheed-e-Azeemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Mailing address: PO Box 667 Srinagar SGR J&K- 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Call us: 09858986794
e.mail: iirc@rediffmail.com
web: http://chenabindustries.blogspot.com

Monday, November 1, 2010

GREY HAIR Treatment Cure for White Hair

Sage is a native of Mediterranean area. It grows wild in the Dalmatian region of Yugoslavia. It is cultivated in Yugoslavia, Italy, Albania, Pakistan, Turkey, Portugal, Spain, Cyprus, England, Canada and USA.In Kashmir, it is sparingly cultivated in Gilgat, Muzaffarabad..

Sage thrives well in rich clayey and loamy soil. A hot and dry climate is not suitable for its cultivation
Uses

Sage is used in the culinary preparation in the West. The taste is fragrant, spicy, warm, astringent and a little bitter. It is used for flavouring meat and fish dishes and for poultry stuffing. Fresh sage leaves are used in salads and sandwiches.
 
Sage-Salvia Cashmiriana leaves for hair has been proven to boost hair growth. It soaks up excess oil and makes dirty hair look fresh. It helps in reversing hair loss problems, promoting hair growth, and strengthening hair for better manageability and shine. Clary sage Leaves  speeds up hair growth and prevents premature balding. If you are wondering about clary sage oil uses in your daily lifestyle, then read this article to find out its uses in aromatherapy, in preventing hair loss, and some simple at-home remedies as well.

The  sage leaves  is valuable for conditions such as:
Digestive Disorders, Female Complaints, Acne,Boils, Hair Loss, Skin Wrinkles, Excess Sebum

The leaves and oil is an antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, antiseptic, deodorant, euphoric, sedative, and nervine tonic. As you can see, sage has many valuable uses in the field of natural medicine, but, interestingly enough, many of its traditional uses are for skin disorders. This is the reason why sage can play a large role in your natural hair loss program.

Sage leaves powder
Price: 550/-50 grams/pkt
(Other pkts: 100, 200, 500 grams
Sage Oil: 1 Ltr. 9500/-
Available at:
Chenab Industries Kashmir-CIK
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
e-mail: cikashmir@gmail.com
home: http://chenabindustries.blogspot.com

Saturday, October 23, 2010

Saffron is recommended for breast cancer

Saffron is recommended for breast cancer
Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) contains chemical constituents that are responsible for its color, flavor and aroma. Saffron contains numerous phytoactive components, including crocetin, various crocins (such as picrocrocin), zeaxanthin, lycopene, beta-carotene and safranal (the main component of saffron's fragrant essential oil). Saffron components have been shown to have strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, anti-carcinogenic and anti-tumor properties, as well as reducing blood pressure, anxiety and depression.

Saffron is recommended for breast cancer
Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) contains chemical constituents that are responsible for its color, flavor and aroma. Saffron contains numerous phytoactive components, including crocetin, various crocins (such as picrocrocin), zeaxanthin, lycopene, beta-carotene and safranal (the main component of saffron's fragrant essential oil). Saffron components have been shown to have strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, anti-carcinogenic and anti-tumor properties, as well as reducing blood pressure, anxiety and depression.

Breast cancer-related effects of eating saffron
Both saffron and crocin have been found to suppress DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in the livers, lungs, kidneys, and spleens of laboratory mice. Saffron has been shown to inhibit carcinogen-induced skin carcinoma in mice and to have cytotoxic action against human leukemia cell lines. Saffron also has been shown to cause cell death in HeLa and HepG2 liver cancer cells and TCC 5637 transitional cell carcinoma cells. Saffron extract and its constituent, crocin, have been shown to significantly inhibit the growth of colorectal cancer cells while not harming normal cells. Crocetin, a major carotenoid component of saffron, has been shown to have significant antiproliferative and proapoptic effects in pancreatic cancer cells in the laboratory and in laboratory mice. Saffron extract has been shown to have dose-dependent inhibitory effects on the proliferation of human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Saffron has been found to greatly inhibit chemotherapy-induced cellular DNA damage. However, there is some evidence that saffron could be toxic at very high doses and we recommend consuming saffron as a spice and not taking saffron tablets.

Additional comments
Saffron is hand picked and hand processed, which is one reason for its high market price. Saffron is grown primarily in Iran, but it is also grown in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Kashmir and some parts of North Africa. Much of the Iranian production is redistributed through Spain. Saffron grown in these regions generally is grown without using pesticides. China is also beginning to produce saffron.

Meadow saffron (Colchicum autumnale), also known as wild saffron, Autumn crocus, or colchicum, is an unrelated and poisonous plant that should not be confused with saffron and is to be avoided. It can cause thirst, pain, diarrhea, weakness, vomiting, kidney failure, coma, and death from respiratory failure. Diluted fractions of meadow saffron are sometimes used in herbal remedies for gout and arthritis.

Saffron might interfere with Warfarin (coumadin) and other blood-thinning therapy since it has been shown to reduce platelet aggregation and thrombosis formation.

Selected breast cancer studies
Flavonoids, Proanthocyanidins, and Cancer Risk: A Network of Case-Control Studies From Italy Nutrition and Cancer, October 2010
The present meta-analysis was designed to investigate the associations between dietary intake of flavonoids and proanthocyanidins and risks of various types of cancer. The meta-analysis analyzed data from multiple Italian case-control studies including approximately 10,000 incident, histologically confirmed cases of selected cancers and more than 16,000 cancer-free controls. Multiple logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for the highest compared to the lowest quintiles (fifths) of consumption of six classes of flavonoids and proanthocyanidins. Total intakes of flavonoids, flavanones, and flavonols were found to be inversely related to oral and laryngeal cancers (OR = 0.56 (oral cancer) and OR = 0.60 (laryngeal cancer) for total flavonoids; 0.51 (oral) and 0.60 (laryngeal) for flavanones; and 0.62 (oral) and 0.32 (laryngeal) for flavonols). Intake of flavanols was also found to be inversely related to laryngeal cancer (OR = 0.64), whereas intake of flavanones was inversely related to esophageal cancer (OR = 0.38). Reduced risk of colorectal cancer was associated with high intake of anthocyanidins (OR = 0.67), flavonols (OR = 0.64), flavones (OR = 0.78), and isoflavones (OR = 0.76). Inverse associations were also found between proanthocyanidins and colorectal cancer, especially for proanthocyanidins with a higher degree of polymerization (OR = 0.69 for ≥ 10 mers). No association between flavonoids and prostate cancer was found. A reduction in risk of breast cancer was found for high dietary intake of flavones (OR = 0.81) and flavonols (OR = 0.80). Common flavones include apigenin and luteolin (tricin is another flavone found primarily in brown rice). Common flavonols include quercetin, kaempferol and fisetin. Flavonols (OR = 0.63) and isoflavones (OR = 0.51) were found to be inversely associated with risk of ovarian cancer, whereas flavonols (OR = 0.69) and flavones (OR = 0.68) were inversely associated with renal cancer.

Circulating Carotenoids, Mammographic Density, and Subsequent Risk of Breast Cancer Cancer Research, November 2009
The present nested case-control study was designed to investigate whether the association between carotenoid consumption and risk of breast cancer is related to mammographic density. High breast density as measured by mammography has been reported to be a powerful indicator of increased breast cancer risk. The study included 604 breast cancer cases and 626 cancer-free controls in the Nurses' Health Study for whom circulating carotenoid (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and lutein/zeaxanthin) levels had been measured and mammograms obtained prospectively. Using a computer-assisted method to determine mammographic density, circulating carotenoids were not found to be associated with mammographic density. However, mammographic density significantly influenced the association between total circulating carotenoids and risk of breast cancer (P heterogeneity = 0.008). Total circulating carotenoid levels were found to be inversely associated with overall breast cancer risk (P trend = 0.01). Among women in the highest third of mammographic density, total circulating carotenoids were associated with a 50% lower risk of breast cancer (odds ratio = 0.5; 95% confidence interval = 0.3 - 0.8). Similarly, among these women, high levels of circulating alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and lutein/zeaxanthin were found to be associated with a significant 40% to 50% reduction in risk of breast cancer (P trend < 0.05). On the other hand, no such inverse association was observed between circulating carotenoids and breast cancer risk among study participants with low mammographic density. The authors conclude that plasma levels of carotenoids may play a role in reducing risk of breast cancer, especially among women with high breast density.

Crocetin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumor progression in a xenograft mouse model Molecular Cancer

Therapeutics, March 2009

The present study was designed to determine whether crocetin, a unique carotenoid found in saffron, significantly affects pancreatic cancer growth. Crocetin was found to inhibit proliferation of MIA-PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells. Crocetin also was found to alter the cell cycle proteins Cdc-2, Cdc-25C, and Cyclin-B1 and epidermal growth factor receptor, inhibiting proliferation. In vivo studies also were performed. Pancreatic cancer cells were injected into the right hind legs of athymic nude mice and crocetin was given orally to the mice after the development of a palpable tumor. Significant regression in tumor growth (with inhibition of proliferation) was found in the crocetin-treated animals compared to the control animals. The authors conclude that crocetin stimulated significant apoptosis in both in vitro pancreatic cancer cells and in vivo mice tumors.

Study of cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of saffron extract in human cancer cell lines Food and Chemical Toxicology, November 2008
The present study was designed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of saffron extract in HepG2 and HeLa liver cancer cell lines. Malignant liver cancer cells and non-malignant cells were cultured and incubated with varying concentrations of an ethanolic saffron extract. Saffron was shown to decrease cell viability in malignant cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Saffron also induced a sub-G1 peak in the flow cytometry histogram of saffron-treated cells compared to the controls, indicating apoptotic cell death was involved. This toxicity was found to be independent of ROS production. The authors conclude that saffron can cause cell death in HeLa and HepG2 liver cancer cells, and that apoptosis or programmed cell death plays an important role in this process.

Crocin from Crocus Sativus Possesses Significant Anti-Proliferation Effects on Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Experimental Oncology, September 2007

The anti-proliferative effects of Crocus sativus and its major component, crocin, on three colorectal cancer cell lines was examined in this study. Crocus sativus' effect on normal cells was also evaluated. The purity of crocin in the extract used was found to be 95.9% and the crocin content was 22.9%. The extract was found to significantly inhibit the growth of all three colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116, SW-480, and HT-29) in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). Proliferation was reduced most significantly in HCT-116 cells; to 45.5% at 1.0 mg/ml and to 6.8 % at 3.0 mg/ml. The Crocus sativus extract also had significant anti-proliferative effects in non-small cell lung cancer cells. However, the extract did not significantly affect the growth of non-cancerous young adult mouse colon cells. The authors concluded that Crocus sativus extract and its major constituent, crocin, significantly inhibited the growth of colorectal cancer cells while not affecting normal cells.

Inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation by style constituents of different Crocus species Anticancer Research, January 2007
Among the different species of Crocus, only the styles of Crocus Sativus L. have been studied extensively, since these constitute the well-known spice saffron. Saffron is widely used in Mediterranean, Indian and Chinese cuisine. In the present study, hydrophilic carotenoids in the styles of three other Crocuses endemic to Greece (C. boryi ssp. tournefortii, C. boryi ssp. boryi, and C. niveus) were discovered and reported on for the first time. Incubation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells for 48 hours with varying concentrations of extracts of all four styles was found to have a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. The antiproliferative effect did not appear to be estrogen related. Studies on the effect of trans-crocin-4 (the main carotenoid constituent of C. sativus styles, digentibiosylester of crocetin), crocetin and safranal showed that the antiproliferative effect was attributable to crocin irrespective of the degree of glycosylation.

Subacute Toxicity of Crocus Sativus L. (Saffron) Stigma Ethanolic Extract in Rats American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2007
The present study was designed to evaluate the possible toxic effects of an extract of Crocus sativus L. stigma on liver, kidney and selected hematological parameters in rats. Establishing the safety of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is important since the medicinal properties attributed to it are extensive. Wistar rats were assigned to four groups of eight. The first group was designated the control. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were treated with an ethanolic extract of saffron in doses of 0.35, 0.70 and 1.05 g per kg, respectively, for two weeks. The body weights of the rats were measured on the first, seventh and final days of the study. Blood-related tests performed on the rats included total RBC count, total WBC count, Hb, %HCT, MCH, MCV and MCHC. Biochemical and serum profile tests included ALT, AST, urea, uric acid and creatinine. Tissue specimens of the rat livers and kidneys were also examined histologically. The extract was found to result in significant reductions in Hb and HCT levels and total RBC count, without a dose-dependent relationship. However, significant dose-dependent increases in total WBC count, ALT, AST, urea, uric acid and creatinine were found in extract-treated rats. Mild to severe liver and kidney tissue injuries were observe microscopically, supporting the biochemical analysis. The authors conclude that extract of Crocus sativus L. stigma is toxic in high doses.

Protective effect of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) aqueous extract against genetic damage induced by anti-tumor agents in mice Human & Experimental Toxicology, February 2006

The genotoxic potential of chemotherapy drugs limits their efficacy in the treatment of cancers. This study was designed to evaluate the chemoprotective potential of saffron against the toxicity of three well-known chemotherapy drugs, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and mitomycin-C, using comet assay. Three doses of saffron (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg of body weight) were orally administered to mice for five days prior to dosing with the drugs under investigation. Pre-treatment with saffron was found to greatly inhibit chemotherapy drug-induced cellular DNA damage (i.e., strand breaks). The authors conclude that, together with previous study results, the findings suggest a potential role for saffron as an adjuvant in chemotherapeutic applications.
Sources: http://foodforbreastcancer.com/foods/saffron

Crocus Sativus L. (Saffron) Stigma available at:
Chenab Industries Kashmir-CIK
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR J&K 190001
Mob: 09858986794
Ph: 01933-223705
e-mail: cikashmir@gmail.com
web: http://chenabindustries.blogspot.com

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Satavari-Asparagus racemosus seeds for sale

Satavari-Asparagus racemosus

Regional Syn : (S) Shatavari (H) Satavari, Shahakul
(B) Satamuli (G) Satavari (T) Kilwari (Per) Satavari (Kashmiri) Wan Gaazar.

Part Used : Root, Leaf, rhizomes and stem

Constituents : Steroidal saponins & glycosides (shatavarin, sarasapogenin, diosgenin), isoflavones, mucilage, alkaloids, asparagamine, sistosterol.

Action/Uses : Refrigerant, demulcent, aphrodisiac, galactagogue,
tonic, antidiarrhoeal,antispasmodic.
Used in; Root; worms, applied on maggot wounds.

Introduction : Shatavari is alterative; antispasmodic; an aphrodisiac, demulcent, digestive, diuretic, galactogogue, and is often used for infertility and for women's health.

Typical Preparations: As an infusion or a tincture. The fresh root is often candied or made into preserves to give it a sugary sweet flavor.

Summary: Shatavari is highly regarded as an herb for women's health and it is the most important herb in Ayurvedic medicine for problems connected to women's fertility. The name Shatavari is from an Indian word meaning "a woman who has a hundred husbands". It is used as a menstrual regulator, to help prevent miscarriage, for menopausal symptoms with hot flushes, irritability, irregular memory and dryness, for lactation, loss of libido, infertility, as an aphrodisiac, and for the female reproductive organs.

Shatavari is also used as a tonic for circulatory, digestive and respiratory organs, ulcers, bronchial infections, diarrhoea, rheumatism, diabetes, bleeding ulcers, gastritis, Crohn's disease, dysentery with bleeding, dry cough, sore throat, inflammation in the lungs due to dryness and heat, male fertility and impotence, building body mass and muscle tissue, nourishing the blood, the immune system, calming the nerves, and insomnia. Externally it is used to treat stiffness in the joints.

Satavari-Asparagus racemosus seeds available at:
50 seeds/pkt. Rs. 350/-
Other pkt: 200, 300,500 seeds
Chenab Industries
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR JK 190001
Ph: 09858986794, 01933-223705
e-mail: cikashmir@gmail.com

Thursday, September 2, 2010

Chinar plants available at Chenab Industries Kashmir-CIK

Chinar Leaf
The director, Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre JKMPIC, Sheikh Gulzaar planted chinar saplings in JKMPIC, Pulwama here yesterday on Monday. While taking to media persons on the occasion, he said Chinar is a heritage tree of the country and as such is a protected plant. Until 2007, Chinar plantation day was observed on March 21 “World Arboretum Day”. However, keeping in view the magnificent and majestic look and attachment and concern of the people of the country of Kashmir with this tree, state government decided to observe March 15 of every year as Chinar Plantation Day, since 2009.  

http://cikashmir.blogspot.com/2010/09/chinar-plants-available-at-chenab.html

The director said another advantage of pre-poning the date from March 21 to March 15 is that longer period for plantation. During last two years 12373 saplings of Chinar have been provided free of cost to the people for plantation in different areas of the country Jammu Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre has established nurseries for propagation of Chinar saplings and during current plantation season and 93373 saplings are available for distribution.

Sheikh Gulzaar said that anybody who is interested in plantation of Chinar tree can contact the concerned Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre and obtain Chinar plants.

As per the un-authentic data of 1970, about 42000 Chinar trees of different age groups and sizes were existing in thecountry . But with the passage of time, turmoil, development programmes and population explosion, Chinar trees have faced the brunt of greed like the forest and other plants had to face.

Under such circumstances, JKMPIC took the serious initiative for raising the Chinar saplings for sustained efforts for annual plantation of saplings.

In order to determine the actual number of existing Chinar trees in the Kashmir , a preliminary census was initiated by the Jammu and Kashmir Medicinal Plants Introduction Centre from 2002 which was completed in 2009.

Chinar Plants Sales office at:
Chenab Industries Kashmir-CIK
POB: 667 GPO Srinagar SGR Jammu and Kashmir 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Mob: 09858986794
e-mail: iirc@rediffmail.com, cikashmir@gmail.com

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Cedrus deodar, Wild Cherry (Prunus serotina),cypress cashmiriana ,Hawthron (Crataegus oxyacantha), Saffron, Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea), Horse Chestnut, Ginkgo Biloba,Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), Ceratonia siliqua, Pyrethrum. Hazelnut (Corylus avellana), Belladonna (Atropa belladonna L.), Saffron corms (Crocus sativus Linn), Dioscorea deltoidea, Geranium, (Geranium maculatum), Lavatera cashmiriana (Althaea officinales Linn), Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum), Malva sylvestris, seeds, Medicinal seeds,

We are one of the premier registered Agriculture, Horticulture & Flouriculture based institution involved in production, development, introduction & exporting of RAW HERBS, FRUITS, SPICES, Fruit, Medicinal Plants,  seeds,Vegetable seeds from the of Kashmir.

Cedrus deodar, Wild Cherry (Prunus serotina),cypress cashmiriana ,Hawthron (Crataegus oxyacantha), Saffron, Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea), Horse Chestnut, Ginkgo Biloba,Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), Ceratonia siliqua, Pyrethrum. Hazelnut (Corylus avellana), Belladonna (Atropa belladonna L.), Saffron corms (Crocus sativus Linn), Dioscorea  deltoidea, Geranium,  (Geranium maculatum), Lavatera cashmiriana (Althaea officinales Linn), Mayapple  (Podophyllum peltatum), Malva sylvestris, seeds, Medicinal seeds, herbs available.

For further details please write to:
Chenab Industries
Ist Street, Shaheed-e-Azeemat Road, Nambalbal, Pampore PPR J&K 192121
Mailing address: PO Box 667 Srinagar SGR J&K- 190001
Ph: 01933-223705
Call us: 09858986794
e.mail: iirc@rediffmail.com